Guiding Principles for Prevention & Education

Prevention Education

  1. Prevention and response training should be in-depth and ongoing. IPV, stalking, and sexual violence are common but very complex issues. In order to make the campus safer, staff, faculty, and students need this level of training. Learn More
  2. Education should be research-based, trauma-informed, and specific to your campus’ needs. Consultation and partnership with campus and/or local IPV experts is key. Learn More
  3. Messages should focus on reducing risk factors, come from all parts of campus, and reach constituents multiple times. Messages about primary prevention should focus on reducing risk factors for perpetrating intimate partner and sexual violence, not just on increasing protective factors for potential victims/survivors. These messages are also important for supporting victims/survivors. Learn More
  4. Prevention should be culturally relevant, appropriate, inclusive, and informed by students, especially victims/survivors. Efforts should be responsive to the needs of marginalized and oppressed groups represented on campus, especially LGBTQI+ students, students with disabilities, and students of color. Student input should be a predominant feature in educational or prevention messaging and curriculum development. Messaging should never reinforce negative stereotypes. Learn More
  5. Create a comprehensive, strategic plan for implementing, assessing, and evaluating prevention efforts. Developing a comprehensive plan, including evaluation, should be the first step of prevention work.  Learn More

Prevention in Real Life

  • Educating Employees

    Educating Employees

    Those on campus tasked with providing education on preventing and responding to IPV and other forms of gender-based violence continue Read More
  • Educating Students

    Educating Students

    It’s May and orientation sessions for the incoming classes of transfer students and international students are planned for mid-August.The campus Read More
  • 1

View additional resources related to this topic

For more information specifically on sexual violence, visit the North Carolina Coalition Against Sexual Assault

Guiding Principles for Prevention

#1 Prevention and response training should be in-depth and ongoing. IPV, stalking, and sexual violence are common but very complex issues. In order to make the campus safer, staff, faculty, and students need this level of training.

What's Required

What's Recommended

#2 Education should be research-based, trauma-informed, and specific to your campus’ needs. Consultation and partnership with campus and/or local IPV experts is key.

What's Recommended

#3 Messages should focus on reducing risk factors, come from all parts of campus, and reach constituents multiple times. Messages about primary prevention should focus on reducing risk factors for perpetrating intimate partner and sexual violence, not just on increasing protective factors for potential victims/survivors. These messages are also important for supporting victims/survivors.

What's Required

What's Recommended

#4 Prevention should be culturally relevant, appropriate, inclusive, and informed by students, especially victims/survivors. Efforts should be responsive to the needs of marginalized and oppressed groups represented on campus, especially LGBTQI+ students, students with disabilities, and students of color. Student input should be a predominant feature in educational or prevention messaging and curriculum development. Messaging should never reinforce negative stereotypes.

What's Recommended

#5 Create a comprehensive, strategic plan for implementing, assessing, and evaluating prevention efforts. Developing a comprehensive plan, including evaluation, should be the first step of prevention work. 

What's Required

What's Recommended